New Zealand

Covid-19: “Comfort” is due to Wellington’s low immunization rate

Health officials need to increase pace to increase “disappointing” vaccination rates in the Wellington area, suggesting more clinics on school grounds and 24-hour centers, experts and politicians say doing.

Supply shortages have been accused of a late start in the region – Always showing the worst performance in vaccine deployment – But with so many Pfizers on the beach, local immunologists suggest that the Wellingtons are happy.

“It feels good for Auckland to get it, but there’s a bit of comfort that you’ll never actually go here because you don’t,” said Graham Le Gros director. Malaghan Institute of Medical Science Said the Vaccine Alliance Aotearoa.

“But Delta will get out of here, and the only way to prevent it is through vaccination. We want to reach 90 percent,” he said.

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By September 14, 31.9% of eligible people in the Wellington area (the area covered by Capital & Coast and Hat Valley DHB) were fully vaccinated, well below 38% nationwide. It shows that.

Professor Graham Le Gros of the Malaghan Institute of Medical Science says Delta is leaving Wellington, and vaccination is the only way to prevent it.

Scott Hammond / Staff

Professor Graham Le Gros of the Malaghan Institute of Medical Science says Delta is leaving Wellington, and vaccination is the only way to prevent it.

Acceleration in recent weeks has raised prices in the region from the second lowest to the third lowest in the country. The numbers released today will reveal if that is the case.

Wellington-based Kuomintang Nicola Willis said it was great to see the rapid acceleration in the last two weeks, but it was still too late. “It’s a shame that we needed a delta outbreak and blockade to put DHB into action,” she said.

“We remain the third lowest on the second dose, which is a shame because it leaves us vulnerable. As Delta enters the community, more people will get sick,” Willis said. Said.

Two DHB CEOs, Fionnagh Dougan, said they were “very happy” with the number of vaccinations to date, with the team nearly 175,000 vaccinations, especially at alert levels 3 and 4. I defended the development when I was there.

Three-quarters of the people in the area were taking their first dose, and the six-week mark was approaching many of them, Dougan said in a statement.

Health Commission boss Fionnagh Dougan defended the vaccine deployment in the region.

ROSA WOODS / Staff

Health Commission boss Fionnagh Dougan defended the vaccine deployment in the region.

“We are looking at different options to help people get vaccinated and complete their vaccination course, and how to engage with people who are difficult to reach and keep asking questions,” she said. Told.

Another drive-through event will be held at Sky Stadium from October 1st, focusing on giving a second dose to those who passed the clinic during the blockade, preventing about 8,000 people in the four days performed She said she was capable of inoculating. ..

“We need to act quickly.”

Dr. Diane Sika Paotnu, an immunologist based at the University of Otago Wellington, said the 24/7 clinic may be an option to help reach those who couldn’t attend the center during the day. said. “Anything we can do to reduce the barrier to vaccines will help. We need to keep acting quickly,” she said.

She emphasized that impartiality must be a fundamental element of vaccination efforts in the Maori and Pacifica communities.

“Most of it is doing what people need to get the health care they need. We know it’s not one size and it doesn’t work in these communities,” says Sika-Paotonu. Stated.

Le Gros said: “I think we need to be a little more innovative about how to reach these communities. The Ministry of Health has some great slogans and I think they did it.

University holds vaccination event

Lower Hutt’s Tita College is hosting a vaccine event this Thursday. It is understood to be one of the first vaccine events in the country on the school grounds.

Fionnagh Dougan, CEO of 2DHB, said vaccination is available to students, staff, Farnau, and children aged 12 to 15 years who have documented consent from parents or guardians.

Karen Morgan, Principal of Taita College, told the students,

Ross Gibrin / Staff

Karen Morgan, Principal of Taita College, told the students, “We have to do a little” as the school prepares to host a vaccine clinic in the school hall. (File photo)

Other schools in the area are continuing to work, according to Dugan, in consideration of minimizing exam interruptions.

Principal Karen Morgan did not respond to a request for comment, but in a video posted on the school’s website, she said: You can do that by getting vaccinated. “

Nurses are in the field, working under Level 2 protocols and caring for students. The school will date the fourth semester, six weeks later, for the second dose.

Last week, the university sent students home with a permit, emphasizing that vaccination was not required, and encouraged parents to sign and send them back.

Willis said he wanted to see this happening in all secondary schools. “We know that young people are the mediators of the infection, so let’s make it really easy for young people to be vaccinated and take advantage of the positive pressure from their peers.”

Le Gros agreed, praising the “smart” event and saying it might help encourage parents and grandparents to appear. “Children are the best spreaders of damn things, so we have to stop it.”

Covid-19: “Comfort” is due to Wellington’s low immunization rate

SourceCovid-19: “Comfort” is due to Wellington’s low immunization rate

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