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How Greenland Elections Can Reduce Access to Australia’s Important Rare Earth Minerals

How Greenland’s elections can reduce Australia’s access to key rare earth minerals needed for defense, batteries and electric vehicles

  • Greenland is home to the world’s largest undeveloped rare earth project.
  • Australian company Greenland Minerals holds a license for the Kvanefjeld project
  • Tuesday’s sudden elections are mainly referendums on mining proposals
  • Australia-listed Greenland Minerals was in the final stages of approval

Elections in Greenland endanger Australia’s future long-term access to key minerals for phones, electric vehicles, batteries, defense and wind turbines.

The region is home to the world’s largest undeveloped rare earth project.May break ChinaIs licensed by the Australian company Greenland Minerals.

The sudden election on Tuesday is a referendum on a predominantly controversial mining proposal after the withdrawal of support by the minor parties shattered Greenland’s middle-middle coalition government.

Elections in Greenland endanger Australia’s future long-term access to key minerals for phones, electric vehicles, batteries, defense and wind turbines (pictured)

Independence from Denmark. Australia-listed Greenland Minerals was in the final stages of obtaining approval for the Kvanefjeld project.

Independence from Denmark. Australia-listed Greenland Minerals was in the final stages of obtaining approval for the Kvanefjeld project.

The Green Left Inuit Friendship opposes the project, leads polls, and the largest party, the Social Democratic Progressive Party, supports development as the key to greater independence from Denmark.

Australia-listed Greenland Minerals was in the final stages of obtaining approval for the Kvanefjeld project.

However, public anger at the risk of uranium dust from the vast grounds led to the dissolution of the government in February, halving the value of the company’s stock on the Australian Stock Exchange.

“The controversy is only relevant to this one project,” Dwayne Menezes, head of polar research and policy initiatives for a London-based independent think tank, told AAP.

“For some, the biggest concern is about ownership in China. For others, it’s about environmental issues.

A subsidiary of China’s Shenghe Resources, one of the world’s largest producers of rare earths, owns slices of Greenland Minerals.

Tuesday's sharp elections are primarily a referendum on controversial mining proposals after the withdrawal of support by minor parties has shattered Greenland's middle-middle coalition government.

Tuesday’s sharp elections are primarily a referendum on controversial mining proposals after the withdrawal of support by minor parties has shattered Greenland’s middle-middle coalition government.

“China has repeatedly shown its willingness to develop economic means for geopolitical gains. Rare earths are probably the sharpest weapon in its arsenal,” said Dr. Menezes.

The mining site contains neodymium, praseodymium, terbium, dysprosium, as well as uranium and thorium, which are radioactive elements that can threaten water quality and sparse agricultural land.

Greenland Minerals has investigated the effects of radiation and states that there are no harmful effects on plants, animals, or people living or visiting the area.

Mineral companies affiliated with Australia, Canada and the United Kingdom hold most of the licenses for exploration, exploration and development in Greenland and are teaming up with the Five Eyes Critical Minerals Alliance.

Quad leaders in Australia, Japan, India and the United States are also influencing global trade rules and trying to increase their production.

Greenland election results are scheduled for Wednesday morning, Greenwich Mean Time.

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How Greenland Elections Can Reduce Access to Australia’s Important Rare Earth Minerals

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