Health

Dad’s love can be important for a happy childhood, research confirms

Barbara Bronson Gray
Health Day Reporter

Friday, June 15 (HealthDay News)-Moving, Tiger Mama. New studies show that fathers can play an even more important role in the growth of happy and well-coordinated children than mothers.

Just in time for Father’s Day, findings from a large review of the study reveal how parental acceptance and rejection can affect personality. descendants Until you grow up.

“A 50-year study on all continents except Antarctica found that nothing had such a strong and consistent impact on personality development that it was rejected by parents, especially fathers. childhoodResearch co-author Ronald Rohner, director of the Ronald and Nancy Rohner Center for the Study of Interpersonal Acceptance and Rejection at the University of Connecticut at Stords, said.

Studies recently published in the journal Personality and Social Psychology ReviewAnalyzes 36 studies from 1975 to 2010 and enrolls approximately 1,400 adults and 8,600 children in 18 countries. Children were 9 to 18 years old and adults were 18 to 89 years old.

All studies included in the review included an assessment of seven personality traits that were considered central to the so-called “parental acceptance-rejection theory.”

These traits (aggression, independence, positive self-esteem, positive self-esteem, emotional response, emotional stability, positive worldview) were assessed using self-questioning. Participants were asked about the degree of acceptance or refusal of their childhood parents and their own personality traits or tendencies.

“This study shows that there is a strong link between these seven characteristics and the experience that parents feel accepted and cared for,” said Professor John Singer. psychology And Pediatrics Tufts University School of Medicine and President of Childhood and Adolescence Psychiatry At Tufts Medical Center in Boston.

“The really important thing for children is to know that they are accepted by their parents,” Sargent said.

The study’s author, Rohner, said that fathers have a significant impact on a child’s personality as children and teens pay more attention to parents who appear to have greater interpersonal power and influence in the family’s power hierarchy. Said that it could give.

He explained that if the father was perceived to have more power, he could have a greater impact, even if he spent less time with the children. That’s because his comments and actions seem to be more prominent. This is despite the fact that mothers spend more time with their children than their fathers around the world.

Unacceptability causes identifiable personality problems, but acceptance does not always bring specific benefits. “Unfortunately, humans react more dramatically to negative things,” Rohner said. Rejection predicts a particular set of negative consequences such as hostility, low self-esteem, and negativeness, but feeling loved and accepted is less closely associated with certain positive consequences. No, he explained.

There was no difference in the importance of the father’s love for girls and boys.

The survey does not establish a causal link between the respondent’s personality and the perception that it was accepted or rejected.

According to Rohner, societies tend to overemphasize the impact of mothers on their children, often blaming mothers for troublesome personalities and behaviors until adulthood. “We need to start giving dads a higher rating and be on an equal footing with moms in terms of their impact on their children,” he said.

“Our work should encourage fathers to really get involved in the loving care of their children when they are young,” Loner said. “Their children will be pretty good.”

Copyright © 2012 HealthDay.. all rights reserved.



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References

Source: Ronald P. Roener, Professor Emeritus and Director of the Center for Interpersonal Acceptance and Rejection, University of Connecticut, Storrs. Dr. John Sargent, Ph.D., Tufts University School of Medicine, Psychology and Pediatrics, Director of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Tufts Medical Center, Boston. May 2012 Personality and Social Psychology Review

Dad’s love can be important for a happy childhood, research confirms

Source link Dad’s love can be important for a happy childhood, research confirms

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